Tim Tebow Auctions his Heisman Trophy for Charity


Credit: JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA - JULY 30: Tim Tebow #85 of the Jacksonville Jaguars catches a pass during Training Camp at TIAA Bank Field on July 30, 2021 in Jacksonville, Florida. (Photo by James Gilbert/Getty Images)

Tim Tebow won the 2007 Heisman Trophy which is awarded to college football’s most outstanding player.  For most athletes, their awards hang on a wall, placed on a shelf, or collect dust in a box.  But for Tim Tebow, he decided to auction off his Trophy to raise money for charity.

Tebow recently told Dan Patrick of The Dan Patrick Show, “every year or every six months, I’ve used it to auction off for a charity for people to keep in their homes.”

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Over the past 8 years, more than $1 million has been raised for charity as his trophy is given to the highest bidder temporarily then passed on to the next.  The first temporary owner was Kathie Lee Gifford and the most recent was country singer Luke Bryan.

Tim Tebow played for the Florida Gators as a quarterback in College and is now an ESPN analyst.  He wants to use his trophy for good to help a worthy cause.

“It is such a cool award that is so prestigious that very few people have ever had the chance to be around it,” he said. “… I’m so grateful. … Why have it in your garage when it can be in someone else’s living room? And now a lot of kids are being helped with it. My goal is that it could be the most impactful Heisman one day not by sitting on a shelf… [but by] being on a lot of other shelves and making an impact on a lot of kids’ lives.”

Tebow was the first sophomore in college to win the award, as only juniors and seniors received the award prior.

He was recently asked how he developed a passion for philanthropy.  Tebow is an outspoken christian and credits is heart for philanthropy to his parents who are missionaries.

“[The thing that] had a huge impact on my life [was] the way that we grew up – having the chance to be born and grow up the first five years of my life in the Philippines,” he said. “… [T]hese trophies and these championships and everything, they’re awesome, but ultimately, they’re not what’s most important – there’s so many things that are more important.

“… And I’m so grateful for that perspective because I’m someone that can totally lean toward win-at-all-costs, do whatever [you] can to drive to compete and win. My parents have just been such impactful, purpose-led heroes in my life.”

 


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